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Timothy Six

These are some things I enjoy.

This is Our Planet from Tomislav Safundžić on Vimeo.

thedailywhat:

Early Bird Special: “This Is Our Planet,” by Croatian 18-year-old Tomislav Safundžić, was created from imagery captured by NASA at the International Space Station.

Wow.

[petapixel]

(Source: thedailywhat)

Tagged with:  #physics  #science  #batman
unknownskywalker:

Progress 47 approaches the ISS
An unpiloted Progress resupply vehicle approaches the International Space Station, carrying 2.8 tons of food, fuel and supplies. The cargo delivery includes 1,988 pounds of propellant, 110 pounds of oxygen and air, 926 pounds of water and 2,703 pounds of spare parts, resupply items and experiment hardware for the residents of the space station.
Progress 47 docked to the station’s Pirs Docking Compartment at 10:39 a.m. (EDT) on April 22, 2012. In the background are the northeast part of the Greek Island of Corfu; the strait of Corfu (center); and the Greek-Albanian mainland (top-top right). The city of Kerkyra (Corfu) is on seen the island at bottom-center.

unknownskywalker:

Progress 47 approaches the ISS

An unpiloted Progress resupply vehicle approaches the International Space Station, carrying 2.8 tons of food, fuel and supplies. The cargo delivery includes 1,988 pounds of propellant, 110 pounds of oxygen and air, 926 pounds of water and 2,703 pounds of spare parts, resupply items and experiment hardware for the residents of the space station.

Progress 47 docked to the station’s Pirs Docking Compartment at 10:39 a.m. (EDT) on April 22, 2012. In the background are the northeast part of the Greek Island of Corfu; the strait of Corfu (center); and the Greek-Albanian mainland (top-top right). The city of Kerkyra (Corfu) is on seen the island at bottom-center.

Tagged with:  #space  #science  #awesome

smithsonianmag:

Never-Before-Seen Photos From the Early Days of Space Exploration

The Gemini astronauts also took some of the most memorable photos in NASA history. You’d think we would have seen them all by now. But with Nasa’s help and funding, a team of researchers at Arizona State University led by lunar scientist Mark Robinson has retrieved from the archives dozens of outtakes that never made it into wide circulation.

Photos: NASA

Ed note: Check out our friends at Air & Space for more stunning photos from the Gemini mission.

(via bbook)

crookedindifference:

The ultimate fate of an expanding universe

Top: Diagrams of three possible geometries of the universe: closed, open and flat from top to bottom, corresponding to a density parameter Ωwhich is greater than, less than or equal to 1. The closed universe is of finite size and, due to its curvature, traveling far enough in one direction will lead back to one’s starting point. The open and flat universes are infinite and traveling in a constant direction will never lead to the same point.

Bottom: The age and ultimate fate of the universe can be determined by measuring the Hubble constant today and extrapolating with the observed value of the deceleration parameter, uniquely characterized by values of density parameters (ΩM for matter and ΩΛ for dark energy). A “closed universe” with ΩM > 1 and ΩΛ = 0 comes to an end in a Big Crunch and is considerably younger than its Hubble age. An “open universe” with ΩM ≤ 1 and ΩΛ = 0 expands forever and has an age that is closer to its Hubble age. For the accelerating universe with nonzero ΩΛ that we inhabit, the age of the universe is coincidentally very close to the Hubble age.

(via crookedindifference)

theatlantic:

In Focus: Images of Earth From Above

Yesterday was Earth Day, a time set aside to increase awareness of the natural environment and the impact of our collective actions. In honor of Earth Day, gathered here is a collection of scenes of our home planet from above, from vantage points we don’t see in everyday life. These scenes help show the Earth as a larger system and demonstrate the extent to which human activity has affected it.

See more. [Images: NASA, Google]

(via fuckyeahprettyplaces)

revelation2220:

Pictured is the Super-Kamiokande, a giant neutrino detector, buried 1000m underground in Japan. Usually filled with 50,000 tonnes of pure water, the observatory detects neutrinos by watching for interactions with the subatomic particles in the water. These interactions are extremely rare, which is why the detector needed to be built to the scale it is.

revelation2220:

Pictured is the Super-Kamiokande, a giant neutrino detector, buried 1000m underground in Japan. Usually filled with 50,000 tonnes of pure water, the observatory detects neutrinos by watching for interactions with the subatomic particles in the water. These interactions are extremely rare, which is why the detector needed to be built to the scale it is.

Tagged with:  #science

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Tornadogenesis—the formation of tornadoes—remains a topic of active research as there is relatively little direct experimental data, owing to the difficulty of prediction as well as measurement. Initially, a variation of wind speed at different altitudes in the atmosphere causes shearing, which can lead to the formation of a horizontal column of rotating air—a vortex line similar to a roll cloud. Beneath a developing storm, the updraft of warm local air can pull this vortex line upwards, creating vertical rotation in the cloud, thereby birthing a supercell.  Supercells do not always spawn tornadoes, and the exact causes that result in tornadic or nontornadic supercells are not fully understood.  However, the formation of tornadoes within the supercell seems dependent on the downdraft of cool air within the storm as well as stretching of the vortex line, which increases its rate of rotation. For more information, check out this explanatory video and some of the talks by Paul Markowski. (Thanks to mindscrib, aggieastronaut and others for their submissions related to this topic! Photo credits: P. Markowski and D. Zaras)

(via proofmathisbeautiful)